Category Archives: Climate Change

Development News November 2022

bethany gas station

• Gas station hearing rescheduled
• American Family Urgent Care in the Kirkland segment of Timberland
• Milltowner update

Washington County News June 2022

• Hauler recycling plan set to begin in July
• Virtual Town Hall: Needs of Older Adults
• Board will address Significant Natural Resources regulations
• Short-term rental requirements and license process
• Commercial food scraps collection services

Ash trees cool the water for fish

ash leaf

Ash trees provide more than just wood for baseball bats. Oregon ash trees (Fraxinus latifolia) are particularly suited to soggy soils and give back by shading streams for fish.

Community News April 2022

neighbors

• Student Academic-Contests for Grades 1-12
• Ask WCSO
Neighborhood Ready? How to win friends and survive a disaster!
• SAMBA Can and Bottle Drive
• Summer childcare help from WCK
• Inside WashCo Shows
• Events at The Reser
• Old Wood Stove Turn-in Event
• Donate a bike to Free Bikes for Kids
• Registration for WashCo Bikes Saddle Up Summer Camps is now open!
• Driver’s Ed for Cyclists
• Legislative Town Hall
• State of the County 2022
• Artist Mingle
• Earth Care Fair
• Call for Beaverton Night Market Vendors
• Public Affairs Forum
• Viva Village April activities
• Everyday Choices Can Improve Your Odds

Area wetlands gain a footing again—with help

wetland

It’s no accident that Oregon is named “The Beaver State.” Beaver-created wetlands historically laced this entire region. Often called “nurseries of life,” wetlands provide important habitat for thousands of species of plants and animals.

Mighty oaks

oak tree

Has a towering tree standing alone caught your eye? It’s likely to be an Oregon White Oak, Quercus garryana, the only oak native to this part of Oregon. Some of these slow-growing oaks may live to be 500 years old and can eventually command a space over 100 feet tall and sixty feet wide, with roots growing far beyond the boundaries of its massive branches.

Love trees? Be a Treekeeper!

treekeepers logo

It’s easy to appreciate trees when they are in the glory of their fall colors, but at Treekeepers of Washington County we celebrate trees all year around. Besides being beautiful, trees provide environmental, economic, and social benefits—including fighting climate change—by absorbing carbon dioxide and airborne pollutants, storing the carbon, and emitting pure oxygen.

Gardening in the drought

Looking around my garden, I am noticing the plants that are damaged from the heat event that we all endured recently. My water bill increased several times the last few months since I turned on my sprinkling system.

Meet Jess Fong

climate club posing

We have been publicizing recycling events at Sunset High School for several months, and we got curious to learn more about one of the students behind this great community service.

Earth Month editorial

With some effects of climate change already upon us, we challenge Washington County to view all their actions through the lens of climate.

If we don’t stop contributing to the problem, our efforts at achieving equity will be meaningless. The powerful will find ways to avoid the consequences, and the rest of us will have to adapt to a planet that may not support the life we want for ourselves, our children, and our grandchildren.

Washington County should establish a Climate Challenge Task Force to advise all county divisions on how to establish goals, make climate friendly decisions, and implement sustainable practices. The Task Force needs to include representatives from commerce, industry, development, science, and community organizations.

We understand that it will take time and effort, but we must begin now. If you agree, send a message to your Washington County Commissioner and to the Chair.

Sunset students tackle climate change

climate change club

Climate change has been a looming threat to us for many years. With the short amount of time we have left to make a change, we need to buy more time for permanent, systemic solutions. Though climate change is a difficult problem to solve, there are simple ways for us as a community to delay its destructive progress.